Rickenbacker International Airport (Guide)

With regard to this airport, it is a civil-military airport 10 miles, 16 km south of downtown Columbus, Ohio, near Lockbourne in southern Franklin County, United States. This airport can be found by codes IATA: LCK, ICAO: KLCK, FAA LID: LCK. This airport is a public one, and every passenger can use their service. Rickenbacker International airport extends into Pickaway County due to the south end of the airport. Eddie Rickenbacker, who was the Columbus native and was flying ace, was the reason why this airport is called like this. The manager of this airport is the Columbus Regional Airport Authority. This authority also serves John Glenn Columbus International Airport and Bolton Field. Even though this airport has had more and more passengers since 2012, this airport is primarily a cargo airport, and this mainly serves the city of Columbus.

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More about Rickenbacker International Airport (Guide)

Rickenbacker International Airport (Guide)

With regard to this airport, it is a civil-military airport 10 miles, 16 km south of downtown Columbus, Ohio, near Lockbourne in southern Franklin County, United States. This airport can be found by codes IATA: LCK, ICAO: KLCK, FAA LID: LCK. This airport is a public one, and every passenger can use their service. Rickenbacker International airport extends into Pickaway County due to the south end of the airport. Eddie Rickenbacker, who was the Columbus native and was flying ace, was the reason why this airport is called like this. The manager of this airport is the Columbus Regional Airport Authority. This authority also serves John Glenn Columbus International Airport and Bolton Field. Even though this airport has had more and more passengers since 2012, this airport is primarily a cargo airport, and this mainly serves the city of Columbus.

There can be a presence of the United States Air Force in the form of the Ohio Air National Guard's 121st Air Refueling Wing. This airport is a home as well for Ohio Army National Guard's Army Aviation Support Facility No. 2. There is the headquarters for the Ohio Military Reserve, which is one of the state defense forces of Ohio.

The Capacity and Business Activity of the Airport

The territory of this airport is 4,342 acres, 1,757 ha, and there are two runways. One of them is Runway 5R/23L: 12,102 ft x 200 ft (3,689 m x 61 m). This one is Asphalt/Concrete. As for another one, it is Runway 5L/23R: 11,902 ft x 150 ft (3,628 m x 46 m), Asphalt.

For the ending date, December 31, 2017, for the twelve months, this airport operated 26,661 aircraft. The average rate was 73 per day, as for percentage: it was 17% general aviation, 29% military, and 54% air carrier. Aircraft, which was based at this airport, was 28: 19 military aircraft, three jet aircraft, three multi-engine, three single-engine.

PlanerSpace started negotiations with the Ohio government to build a spaceport at Rickenbacker in December 2006. In 2006 they also completed a Noise Compatibility Study for the airport. This program guides how to avoid additional problems due to high aircraft noise. Worth to mention, that AirNet Express headquarters are placed there.

However, in 2008, Norfolk Southern started operating there, and due to its service, this airport now can handle approximately 250,000 Intermodal containers every year. This project helps to have easy access to and from Norfolk, Virginia.

History and Present-day Operations

At first, the facility, which started here, was Lockbourne Army Airfield, the name was due to the nearby village. This was then named as the Northeastern Training Center of the Army Air Corps, which provided basic pilot training, as well as military support. After the war, this field was used to develop facilities for all-weather military flight operations. During the Cold War, this was redesignated as the Rickenbacker Air Force Base on May 18, 1974.

However, In august 2001, at Rickenbacker International airport, the new construction started, which was for the Navy and Marine Corps Air Reserve Center. The center's cost was $10 million, and it had to be done in 2003. Then it was redeveloped once again by the Columbus Regional Airport Authority, and now this airport is governed by them.